Is Your Team Ready for the Challenge of Change?



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Cover Story Sidebar -- October 2000  

Texas Department of Health's Put Prevention Into Practice (PPIP) program has created the following self-assessment tool for physicians and their staffs to determine their willingness to implement systems for preventive services.

Consider asking staff members from all areas of your practice to complete the questionnaire, and then compare your answers and discuss beliefs about what actually is happening in your practice. "No" responses suggest areas to be addressed during the planning of an effective prevention program.

For a copy of this survey and other PPIP information, call (512) 458-7534 or visit the PPIP Web site at www.tdh.state.tx.us/ppip/index.htm

Readiness to Put Prevention Into Your Practice

 

QUESTIONS  

 

YES  

NO  


Program Champion

Our practice has someone who is willing to truly make prevention happen (someone with the vision, leadership, and authority to make it work).

 


Y
 


N
 


Philosophy of Prevention

Prevention is an important aspect of the care we provide in this practice.

 


Y
 


N
 


Pre-Implementation Planning

We can allow adequate planning time to incorporate prevention in our practice.

 


Y
 


N
 


Role in Patient Education
The physicians and nurses in our practice regard patient education as one of their main tasks.

 


Y
 


N
 


Administrative Support
This practice is willing to allocate resources (eg, time, training, personnel, and space) to implement a comprehensive clinical prevention program.

 


Y
 


N
 


Teamwork
Internal communication and teamwork are strong among staff and physicians in our practice.

 


Y
 


N
 


Prior Prevention Programs
Our practice has already implemented, or has tried to implement, specific programs for prevention, such as programs for cancer prevention, smoking cessation, and diabetes prevention.

 


Y
 


N
 


Quality Assurance
We have quality systems, such as total quality management (TQM) and continuous quality improvement (CQI), in place to assess and improve patient care service delivery.

 


Y
 


N
 

 


Count the number of times you answered "Yes"
7-8: You are ready to put prevention into practice.
4-6: You may need more information. Address issues that had "No" responses.
0-3: You are not yet ready, and you need to address issues that had "No" responses.

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TMA Advantage: TMA tackles patient safety through team approach
TMA Advantage: HeartCare partners receive recognition awards
TMA Advantage: Physician Services gets satisfaction
TMA Advantage: POEP earns funding
TMA Advantage: Stroke Project stresses prevention  

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